Entries by tag: if i die the price goes up

Sloppy self-portrait
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plunderpuss

multi-media experiment by plunderpuss

This was just an experiment I did as a warm-up. (Soon you are going to get to see some illustrations, cross my heart, but I’m having technical difficulties so you’re stuck with warm-ups for now.)

For anyone curious about what it was I actually did: I sketched my own dumb face chewing on a paintbrush, painted over the lines with rubber cement, let it dry, slopped purple and orange liquid acrylic ink all over, let it dry, peeled off the rubber cement, and then scribbled on the white parts with three shades of blue Copic marker. If you click you can see a bigger version…Read the rest of this entry »Collapse )

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


Some more valentines
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plunderpuss

&quot;Honey Badger&quot; valentine by plunderpuss (Copic markers, 2013)And three more, this time with blood and rotting flesh! Yeah, I’m a connoisseur of romance. <3

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Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


Some Valentines
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plunderpuss

This month, my art is up on the walls at the Black Drop Coffeehouse (can you tell this is my favorite place to display it?), along with Tod Wills.

Instead of selling the artwork, however, I’m selling Valentine’s Day cards featuring my artwork. Here are a few of the designs:

&quot;Friend Zone&quot; Valentine&quot;s Day card by plunderpuss. Copic markers, 2013.

Three more…
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Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


Anglerfish Mermaid with Sailor Husbands
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plunderpuss

Tod had a creepy dream awhile back, and when he told me about it, I was so fascinated that I began sketching various interpretations and didn’t stop for the rest of the night. I ended up with this:

marker drawing of an anglerfish mermaid with sailor husbands, by plunderpuss

If you don’t know how anglerfish reproduce, you should check out this video.

This picture comes with some sad news, though. I’ve been signing my art as Puss in Boots for a very long time–since before that first Shrek film, in fact. I used to be the top hit in search engines for “puss in boots artist.” And it used to be that when I registered for a site, my username could always be “pussinboots.”

It’s not like that anymore. It’s taken me over a decade to resign myself to the fact that I ought to change my name. I loved Shrek, but I can’t help but be sort of pissed at Dreamworks for making my semi-obscure fairy tale name into something ridiculously popular. Le sigh! So going forward, I’m going to use “plunderpuss,” like my domain.

It’s what pirate cats threaten you with! Give them your valuables and no one gets hurt!

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


My illustration in Four
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plunderpuss

One of my favorite writers (and yes I’m biased, because he has attacked me with a pair of oversized novelty scissors, which I found strangely endearing) released a tiny collection of his work called Four, just for the experience of making an e-book. Keffy drew the cover himself, and commissioned interior illustrations from four other artists, including me.

I can’t find a place with a working download of the book, but I wanted to share the illustration while I still like it. (If I let my art get too old before showing it off, the next time I look at it I don’t want anyone to see it ever again, haha!)

illustration by Puss in Boots for &quot;Bone Dice&quot; by Keffy R. M. Kehrli

For "Bone Dice" by Keffy R. M. Kehrli. Illustration by Puss in Boots.

 

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


How to Be a Famous Author
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plunderpuss

 

comic about how to be a famous author, drawn by Puss in Boots

(This comic brought to you by a snark festival about writers-who-don't-write that Keffy and I had a few months ago.*)

Yes, ha ha, but also:

It takes hard work to translate an ethereal dream from inside your head into a set of sharp-edged, black-and-white characters outside of your head. It’s even more difficult to array the spell in a way that will magically evoke the same original dream inside someone else’s head, merely by looking at what you’ve done.

The work doesn’t get any easier if you don’t get much practice or procrastinate on finishing it. All that will happen is you’ll suddenly realize it took you ten years to draw a map, some character profiles, and revise the first three chapters seventeen times. You need to write forward, not back-and-forth. There’s a reason you take a train to visit another city instead of a playground swing.

Go. Write a spell that gives at least one reader a kick-ass dream inside their head.

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


NaNoWriMo 2012!!!1
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plunderpuss

 

Shut up, I’m excited. And instead of making you hear about it every day for the whole month, I have devised a clever system so you will only hear about it five times. I am a magnanimous blogger who understands that you don’t actually care about my silly project, which is basically a composite of the granny videogames I like to play.

For those of you who don’t play hidden object games, the kind with plots almost all revolve around a missing person who you must track down, either because you love them or you’re being paid. There are complex, ridiculous locks on doors, trunks, graves–you name it, some wacko put a lock on it. Most of them don’t even use keys; they use math and/or logic problems, memory games, etc. Here’s one of my favorites that uses three keys, from Nightmares of the Deep: The Cursed Heart.

screenshot from Artifex Mundi&quot;s &quot;Nightmares of the Deep: The Cursed Heart&quot;

Artifex Mundi made "Nightmares of the Deep: The Cursed Heart," and here's a typical (gorgeously rendered!) lock from the game.

This story was born when I asked myself the question: What elements could steer a society into actually developing these frivolous locks? Any one of them could be knocked off with a sledgehammer, so it would need to be fashion rather than function–perhaps a cultural institution that began as a necessity and turned into a matter of etiquette. Once the locks kept us safe from monsters…but now they’re a luxury toy for wealthy adults. After all, there’s no more monsters, right?

silly mockup cover for Cory Skerry&quot;s NaNoWriMo 2012

I nabbed the house, the night sky, the dresses, and the movie wolf from Google Images; hopefully no one sues me. All three people faces are mine; hopefully I won't sue me either.

PERILS OF THE PAST: The Secrets of Bonegarden
(Yes, my goofy title is an homage to the games, as well. They all are Something Preposition/Article Something: The Something Something.)

To avoid working for her shady family, Ermine uses her thief skills to test products for a brilliant young locksmith named Cazh. When he disappears–without paying her for her last job, which was breaking through locks he put on her bedroom door without her permission–she decides to get in touch with her roots and track him down for some good ol’-fashioned, possibly violent debt-collecting.

One of Cazh’s friends, a circus performer named Peach, is worried because she knows exactly where he went. She insists on accompanying Ermine as they track Cazh to one of the many mansions that were abandoned when the plague of monsters ended over a century ago. The nobility spent years hiding from the threat, living in fabulous opulence behind concentric rings of locked gates and walls. Now, it’s a deadly wasteland of rampant vines, broken glass, and rotting architecture. Worst of all is the ominous evidence that something large and carnivorous inhabits the labyrinthine estate.

Low on food, fatigued, and injured, they finally find a cryptic message from Cazh inscribed on one of the locks… just before they’re attacked by a monster right out of history books. They make a narrow escape, but there’s no place to hide for long. As they flee deeper into the estate, leaving improvised traps in their wake, Ermine and Peach must figure out how to save themselves—and whether or not they still want to rescue the boy who gazes down at them from the safety of the tallest tower.

You heard tell of a clever system for only posting about NaNoWriMo five times! If you are brave and click for more, you’ll be rewarded with extra pictures.Read the rest of this entry »Collapse )

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


Orange & Purple
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plunderpuss

The other day I got all obsessed with these colors together. Here’s some of what I’ve done with them so far:

scribbled rockstar by Puss in BootsLiquid acrylics & Copic markers (not like you were surprised).

glowy-eyed owl by Puss in Boots

Copic & Prismacolor marker, liquid acrylics. I used colors that were too similar to do the patterns on the owl–they just look like marker rash, especially in the scan. Fooey!

orange and purple striped cat by Puss in BootsWatercolor pencils and liquid acrylics.

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


OWLS!!
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plunderpuss

owls by Puss in BootsMore owls: Read the rest of this entry »Collapse )

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


Art in Reverse
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plunderpuss

sketches of pretty humans with green skin and rainbow hair by Puss in Boots

In some ways, Clarion West changed the way I was beginning doodles and drawings. I’m not sure I’m prepared to elaborate quite yet; I’m still working on how to describe the association I’m making between two entirely different craft techniques. The unrefined, bumbling version is this:

Ideally in my fiction I will suggest how the world works with as few directives as possible, so the reader is inventing the rules, only they’re inventing the rules I intended all along. So in my art, I’m now interested in offering patches of color or chiaroscuro that suggest where the lines go, so the viewer “sees” them without their physical presence.

I’m not even close–I’m still just playing with the radical notion of adding the lines after the color. This is a big step, since I basically spent sixteen+ years making my own personal coloring books. Well, I’m done with ‘em! I don’t want the line gestapo aggressively shouting orders at me about where the colors should be corralled. Even if, um, I’m the one who put the line gestapo in place.

My goal is to be able to make things that work with some of the principles seen in this image:

Commission for Dulin by Rah (Sarah Cloutier)

"Discussion" for Dulin by Rah, used without permission. Click to go to her gallery & see the full image.

We know where the boundaries are, even if they don’t technically exist: the white shirt flowing into the top of the table; the black jacket flowing into the shadow under the table; and the pale-haired figure’s invisible chin. I’m hoping I can suggest where fabric is stressed without drawing the entire fold, just its shadow, and likewise that I can learn to avoid saying, “The swamp was dangerous because it was full of carnivorous eels” and instead leaving bright clues, like everyone wearing knee-high leather boots studded with iron spikes and carrying boat hooks.

I’m curious to see more of these transmedial craft techniques, because I doubt I’m the only one who makes them, but I suspect they may be highly individualized and sometimes untranslatable to other humans. Does my association between subtlety in fictional worldbuilding and drawing some people at a table make sense to you? Did it bring up any other similar associations in your mind? Art and theater, ballet and fiction, sculpture and music?

Originally published at Calamity Cove. You can comment here or there.


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